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4 comments

  • Comment Link lacikSok Tuesday, 18 July 2017 08:14 posted by lacikSok

    Overview
    The Accessory Navicular is an extra bone or piece of cartilage located on the inner side of the foot just above the arch. It is incorporated within the posterior tibial tendon, which attaches in this area. Some people with this extra bone develop a painful condition known as Accessory Navicular Syndrome when the bone and/or posterior tibial tendon are aggravated.


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    Causes
    Just having an accessory navicular bone is not necessarily a bad thing. Not all people with these accessory bones have symptoms. Symptoms arise when the accessory navicular is overly large or when an injury disrupts the fibrous tissue between the navicular and the accessory navicular. A very large accessory navicular can cause a bump on the instep that rubs on your shoe causing pain.

    Symptoms
    What are the signs/symptoms of Accessory Navicular Syndrome? Pain in the foot following trauma (such as after an ankle sprain) Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the bone. A visible bony prominence on the inner side of the foot just above the arch. Redness and swelling of that area. Vague pain or throbbing in the arch mostly occuring during or after periods of physical activity. Symptoms appear most often during adolescence, but some may not occur until adulthood.

    Diagnosis
    Diagnosis is fairly simple based on an examination by your doctor. He or she will palpate the navicular bone, and based on the location of pain will suspect an accessory navicular. The doctor will also observe your gait to see if you are flatfooted. At this point an x-ray will make the definitive diagnosis. Other causes of pain in the same area of the foot would include a fracture of the navicular bone or possibly tendonitis or even a partial tear of the tibialis posterior tendon that inserts into the navicular. In these cases there is usually a history of trauma. People with a naturally "large" navicular bone may also develop a bursitis due to chronic shoe pressure.

    Non Surgical Treatment
    The goal of non-surgical treatment for accessory navicular syndrome is to relieve the symptoms. The following may be used. Immobilization. Placing the foot in a cast or removable walking boot allows the affected area to rest and decreases the inflammation. Ice. To reduce swelling, a bag of ice covered with a thin towel is applied to the affected area. Do not put ice directly on the skin. Medications. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be prescribed. In some cases, oral or injected steroid medications may be used in combination with immobilization to reduce pain and inflammation. Physical therapy. Physical therapy may be prescribed, including exercises and treatments to strengthen the muscles and decrease inflammation. The exercises may also help prevent recurrence of the symptoms. Orthotic devices. Custom orthotic devices that fit into the shoe provide support for the arch, and may play a role in preventing future symptoms. Even after successful treatment, the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome sometimes reappear. When this happens, non-surgical approaches are usually repeated.



    Surgical Treatment
    If all nonsurgical measures fail and the fragment continues to be painful, surgery may be recommended. The most common procedure used to treat the symptomatic accessory navicular is the Kidner procedure. A small incision is made in the instep of the foot over the accessory navicular. The accessory navicular is then detached from the posterior tibial tendon and removed from the foot. The posterior tibial tendon is reattached to the remaining normal navicular. Following the procedure, the skin incision is closed with stitches, and a bulky bandage and splint are applied to the foot and ankle. You may need to use crutches for several days after surgery. Your stitches will be removed in 10 to 14 days (unless they are the absorbable type, which will not need to be taken out). You should be safe to be released to full activity in about six weeks.

  • Comment Link MichaelTus Tuesday, 18 July 2017 04:51 posted by MichaelTus

    Overview
    An accessory navicular is defined as an extra bone in the foot, and oftentimes it causes moderate to severe discomfort. Depending on the severity, your doctor may recommend a non-surgical treatment to alleviate the pain, or surgery if treatment doesn?t decrease symptoms.



    Causes
    Accessory navicular syndrome as it is called can result from a number of causes, excess or overuse syndrome as seen in an athlete. Trauma to the foot as in an ankle sprain or direct trauma to the navicular bone. chronic irritation from shoes rubbing against the extra bone, over time, may cause pain. Excessive pronation which strains the attachment of tibialis posterior muscles into the navicular bone. Keep in mind, the larger the actual accessory bone, the greater the chance of it becoming an issue.

    Symptoms
    Adolescence is a common time for the symptoms to first appear. This is a time when bones are maturing and cartilage is developing into bone. Sometimes, however, the symptoms do not occur until adulthood. The signs and symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome include a visible bony prominence on the midfoot (the inner side of the foot, just above the arch) Redness and swelling of the bony prominence, Vague pain or throbbing in the midfoot and arch, usually occurring during or after periods of activity.

    Diagnosis
    Upon examining a foot with a symptomatic accessory navicular, there will often be a bony prominence on the inside of the foot, just below and in front of the inside ankle bone (medial malleolus). The size of this prominence will vary from small to quite large. Pressing over this area will often cause discomfort. There may be an associated flat foot deformity as this can occur in patients with an accessory navicular. Stressing the posterior tibial tendon by raising the heel up and down on one foot, or by forcing the foot to the inside against resistance, may aggravate the symptoms as these maneuvers stress the posterior tibial tendon which is attached on the inside of the accessory navicular bone. Patients may walk with a slight limp due to the pain.

    Non Surgical Treatment
    The goal of non-surgical treatment for accessory navicular syndrome is to relieve the symptoms. The following may be used. Immobilization. Placing the foot in a cast or removable walking boot allows the affected area to rest and decreases the inflammation. Ice. To reduce swelling, a bag of ice covered with a thin towel is applied to the affected area. Do not put ice directly on the skin. Medications. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be prescribed. In some cases, oral or injected steroid medications may be used in combination with immobilization to reduce pain and inflammation. Physical therapy. Physical therapy may be prescribed, including exercises and treatments to strengthen the muscles and decrease inflammation. The exercises may also help prevent recurrence of the symptoms. Orthotic devices. Custom orthotic devices that fit into the shoe provide support for the arch, and may play a role in preventing future symptoms. Even after successful treatment, the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome sometimes reappear. When this happens, non-surgical approaches are usually repeated.



    Surgical Treatment
    For patients who have failed conservative care or who have had recurrent symptoms, surgery can be considered. Surgical intervention requires an excision of the accessory navicular and reattachment of the posterior tibial tendon to the navicular. Often times, this is the only procedure necessary. However, if there are other deformities such as a flat foot or forefoot that is abducted, other procedures may be required.

  • Comment Link egestas Friday, 18 May 2012 05:09 posted by egestas

    Phasellus egestas laoreet turpis, quis accumsan ligula commodo ut. Aenean molestie quam ac sem tincidunt cursus eget vel quam. Fusce cursus, diam a consectetur eleifend, nunc mi rutrum ante, non congue lacus risus a orci.

  • Comment Link Donec Tuesday, 15 May 2012 07:50 posted by Donec

    Donec dapibus, leo non interdum imperdiet, libero justo tempus turpis, sit amet feugiat odio sem sit amet orci. Donec posuere feugiat erat iaculis tempor. Aliquam vitae fermentum lacus. Mauris neque libero, scelerisque a gravida nec, convallis sed nulla.

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